Sex reversal

Vasectomy reversal is a term used for surgical procedures that reconnect the male reproductive tract after interruption by a vasectomy. A sex reversal or regional anesthetic is most commonly used, as this offers the least interruption by patient movement for microsurgery.

Local anesthesia, with or without sedation, can also be used. 2 cm incision in the upper scrotum on each side. The vas deferens is cut sharply in half, both above and below the vasectomy site. A special bipolar microcautery is used to judiciously control any bleeding. For a vasovasostomy, two microsurgical approaches are most commonly used. Neither has proven superior to the other.

What has been shown to be important, however, is that the surgeon use optical magnification to perform the vasectomy reversal. One approach is the modified 1-layer vasovasostomy and the other is a formal, 2-layer vasovasostomy. A vasoepididymostomy involves a connection of the vas deferens to the epididymis. This is necessary when there is no sperm present in the vas deferens. With vasectomy reversal surgery, there are two typical measures of success: patency rate, or return of some moving sperm to the ejaculate after vasectomy reversal, and pregnancy rates. The age of the patient at the time of vasectomy reversal does not appear to matter.