Sex at window

You can see only 130 seconds. Confessions of a Window Cleaner is a 1974 British sex comedy film, sex at window by Val Guest.

The optimistic and inept Timothy Lea is freshly employed by his brother-in-law Sid as a window cleaner. With Sid an impending father to be, he looks to Timmy to fully ‘satisfy’ his customers, little realising that Timmy’s accident prone ways often stretch to his sex life with his clients. Timmy bed hops from unsatisfied housewives to even a lesbian love tryst, all the while with his main eye on successful police officer, Elizabeth Radlett, who will have none of Timmy’s sexual advances. The film is essentially an adaptation of a sex novel printed in paperback form.

It was adapted for the screen in the 1970s, when the British film industry produced a large number of film adaptations of literary works. The series of source novels about Timmy Lea had benefited from a literary forgery, the notion that Lea was not a fictional character but the actual author. The series was a sexual fantasy masquerading as confessional writing, a genre which tends to attract audiences. 100,000, but not really an independent film. The film benefited from changes in the culture of the United Kingdom, with an increasingly permissive society and changes in aspects of the censorship standards. This film series also made a point of casting actors already familiar to television audiences.

The idea was probably to attract that audience to the cinema. The interior of the Lea house was depicted as brightly lit and filled with eccentric items of doubtful use, such as a moose head and a gorilla suit. The characters are confined to the “cramped” space of every depicted room, again reminiscent of the sets of a sitcom. In criticising the original novels, sociologist Simon Frith had argued that the books derived their unflattering depiction of the British working class from stereotypes. In particular, the stereotypes which the middle class associates for “the great unwashed”.

Part of the humour of the film derives from a situation based on class stratification in the United Kingdom. The Leas are positioned at the bottom of the working class, barely above the criminal underclass, while the Radletts are upper middle class. While the premise of the film would be suitable for a pornographic film, the film focuses less on sexual intercourse and more on associated problems and anxieties. Timmy at first fails to perform, and the film deals with his embarrassment over his sexual inexperience and ineptitude. Like the horror films of the 1970s, the film is set in the familiar urban landscape of Great Britain. There is a contrast in the film between the character of Timmy and the women with which he interacts.