Safe sex strategies

Jump to navigation Jump to search For the youth crisis safe sex strategies organization, see National Safe Place. The examples and perspective in this article deal primarily with Western culture and do not represent a worldwide view of the subject. This article may lend undue weight to certain ideas, incidents, or controversies. An inverted pink triangle surrounded by a green circle, as used to symbolize alliance with gay rights and space free from homophobia.

200,000 Muslims in Victoria stated that the Muslim community suffered mental health and other problems due to the suspicions to which it is subjected. The ICV proposed that Islamic community groups be given funds to create “safe spaces” where “inflammatory” issues could be discussed without being judged. Government rejected the proposal and instigated a review of government funding towards the ICV. In early 2015 the increasing adoption of safe spaces in UK universities aroused controversy due to accusations that they were used to stifle free speech and differing political views.

She had waved her arms in disgust with a claim made against her by another speaker. In September 2016, Prime Minister Theresa May hit out at universities for implementing “safe space” policies amid concerns that self-censorship is curtailing freedom of speech on campuses. The Prime Minister said it was “quite extraordinary” for universities to ban the discussion of certain topics which could cause offence. She warned that stifling free speech could have a negative impact on Britain’s economic and social success.

In the United States the concept originated in the women’s movement, where it “implies a certain license to speak and act freely, form collective strength, and generate strategies for resistancea means rather than an end and not only a physical space but also a space created by the coming together of women searching for community. In general, these may be individuals or institutions which support a safe space for LGBT students and employees. The idea of safe spaces has been criticized on the grounds that it stifles freedom of speech. Writing for The New York Times in 2015, journalist Judith Shulevitz distinguished between meetings where participants mutually consent to provide a safe space, and attempts to make entire dormitories or student newspapers safe spaces.