Personalized sex books

Welcome to Pegasus Books in New Zealand, named after the horse of classical lore who, by stamping his hoof, gave rise to the Fountain of the Muses—inspiration—literature—and BOOKSHOPS. Spiritual Paths, Art, Music, and Architecture and Design. There are good holdings in such personalized sex books as New Zealand subjects, Sociology and Anthropology, Eastern Religions, Christianity, History, Criticism, Travel, and Maori Books. Our small staff offers personalized service, a wide knowledge of books, and several ordering options.

See below for more information on ordering. Contact us to check that the book is still available. Every effort is made to keep our website up to date, but we are continually buying and selling books. You will need to ask for the cost of postage to your location and for any additional information you require on the book.

For this option you will need to provide your full name, credit card number and expiry date. This information will be handled with full security and confidentiality, and will be destroyed when your order has been processed. Please remember to include your full postal address with your order. Some of our stock is also listed at abebooks. Thank you for visiting Pegasus Books New Zealand. The emergence of the middle school movement in the 1960s represented a milestone in the history of Human Development Discourse.

This movement recognized that young adolescents are not simply older elementary school students nor younger high school students, but that there are dramatic changes that occur during this time of life requiring a radically different and unique approach to education. Regrettably, the rise of Academic Achievement Discourse over the past few years threatens to undermine these reforms. The enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act certainly is part of the reason for the abandonment of the middle school philosophy in recent years. Steven van Zandt, principal of Aviara Oaks Middle School in Carlsbad, California. Middle schools, or something very much like them, are needed to provide students in early adolescence with an environment that can help them negotiate the impact of puberty on their intellectual, social, and emotional lives. Educators need to understand the developmental needs of young adolescents, and in particular their neurological, social, emotional, and metacognitive growth. Having said this, we can now turn to the changes themselves.

Overall, though, early adolescence presents a neurological picture that involves a relatively developed limbic system or emotional brain coexisting with a relatively underdeveloped prefrontal cortex. What all this means is that the biggest need for young adolescents in education is not getting higher test scores but rather learning how to direct those surging emotional impulses into productive channels, learning how to transmute the drive for mate-seeking into positive social relationships, and learning how to mobilize their newly developed metacognitive abilities in the service of reflecting on and modulating the transformations that are taking place in their bodies and minds. For thousands of years, cultures have known about the perils and promises of puberty and have organized special educational interventions at this time. By our modern standards, these rites of passage do not pass muster. One of the tragedies of contemporary life is that no fully developed rites of passage exist for taking adolescents from childhood to adulthood. As a result, many adolescents try to create their own rites of passage through drug experimentation, highway thrills, sexual risk taking, gang violence, binge drinking, or other dangerous activities that serve to separate them from childhood but that do not, alas, manage to incorporate them into the community of mature adults.

Inappropriate Developmental Practices in Middle Schools One of the biggest problems with the recent abandonment of middle schools by school districts around the country is that the entire middle school philosophy is being rejected in reaction to poorly planned middle school experiments that simply didn’t work out. Similarly shortsighted is the idea that the problems of early adolescence can be solved simply by putting 7th and 8th graders back in elementary school. As noted above, some indigenous cultures have intuitively understood the precarious nature of puberty and have devised carefully planned environments within which the dangerous aspects of puberty can be safely navigated to help the adolescent cross the bridge into maturity. Throwing a student into a large and impersonal middle school environment does not show much thought or sensitivity with regard to this important responsibility. Entering puberty is difficult enough without having to endure school environments that threaten young teens with bullying, name calling, drugs, and violence. These kinds of negative experiences are poisons that interact insidiously with young adolescents’ delicate neurological and emotional makeup and threaten to create negative behavior patterns that will haunt them for the rest of their lives. One of the problems with current emphasis on academic content and skills at the middle school level is that students are required to meet hundreds of standards that ultimately threaten to overwhelm them in a sea of paperwork and meaningless assignments.

Adrift in a sea of irrelevant content, young teens are deprived of the opportunity to engage in focused learning adventures that can help them develop their identities, sharpen their metacognitive minds, and channel their burgeoning energies. Individuals going through early adolescence are particularly sensitive to the presence or absence of emotion in their classroom learning experiences. If they are required to learn in classrooms that largely emphasize lecture, textbooks, written assignments, and tests, their own motivation is likely to wane. In one study of middle school students’ perceptions of learning experiences, most students reported that active learning motivated them more often than lecture, overhead, or textbook learning. Well, I feel that when I’m working in a group and not in the textbooks that I learn the most—’cause the textbooks—some people, they don’t follow it.

The Best Middle Schools: Examples of Developmentally Appropriate Educational Practices What we know about early adolescents and their neurological, social, emotional, and intellectual growth provides us with solid guidelines in structuring optimal middle schools. Safe School Climate The most important factor in meeting the needs of young adolescents in school is a safe school climate. Zero-tolerance policies are not the solution for making schools safe. Instead, schools need to create positive interventions that get at the root of the difficulty, including anti-bullying programs, conflict resolution, character education, gang awareness, alcohol and drug abuse counseling, student court, peer mediation, and anger management. At Lewis Middle School in Paso Robles, California, students tutor kids academically, mediate conflicts, and mingle with shy 6th graders who are having difficulty making the transition from elementary school. Small Learning Communities A large body of research supports—and demands—the implementation of small school environments at the middle level.

Personal Adult Relationships Coming of age in the 21st century is a difficult prospect for many kids who have little contact even with their own parents. Very little time is spent in the company of adults. On the other hand, providing a student with one teacher who serves as an advisor, mentor, counselor, or guide can be instrumental for some kids to help them feel a sense of safety, confidence, and purpose in their learning. Engaged Learning An observation that has been consistently noted about young adolescents is their decreased motivation for learning compared to kids in the elementary school years. This has traditionally been ascribed to the physiological and emotional changes going on inside them.