Dolly golden sex

THE EXCLUSIVE COPYRIGHTED WORKS OF COLOR CLIMAX CORP. Servants have generally dolly golden sex idea of proportion, and in bluing clothes they seem to have a propensity to color too highly. This should be restricted, as it deprives the clothes of that snowy appearance, which is their greatest beauty.

Tie a piece of blue in a flannel or cotton bag, squeeze it in cold water till the right shade of colour is obtained. It should be a good sky-blue tint when lifted in the hand. Mix thoroughly, and keep it stirred to prevent the powder settling and making the linen streaky. Shake out each piece and dip it in a tub of blue water, first stirring the water up so that it does not make the linen streaky.

English Laundresses: A Social History, 1850-1930 from Amazon. I have been laundress to the Prince of Wales for several years, and I consider Reckitt’s Paris blue is the best I ever used, and is undoubtedly greatly superior to the old-fashioned thumb or dark blue. It’s been found in early 20th century clothing made by indigenous people in Quebec, and in the ink used in Coptic manuscripts in 1930s Egypt. Now it’s sold for yet another purpose: providing the blue water for magical rituals from various Caribbean traditions. Before factory-made chemicals were available, clothes were whitened with blue derived from indigo, or from powdered blue smalt: ground glass containing cobalt.

The indigo was processed, mixed with starch, and sometimes other additives, and formed into lumps. This was stone blue, or fig blue, or thumb blue. Powder blue was bought loose, by weight. Blue mixtures were often called “blue starch”. Extra starch might be added, depending on what was being laundered.

An 18th century housekeeping manual described a good method for white linens and cottons. Moisten the quantity of starch you want to use, according to the quantity of your cloaths, with water, and put as much stone blue as is necessary. When the starch and blue are properly mixed, then let the whole boil together a quarter of an hour longer, taking care to keep stirring it, because that makes it much stiffer and is better for the linen. Such things as you would have most stiff, ought to be put first into the water, and you may weaken the starch by pouring a little water upon it. Finer clothes would need more careful treatment. White lace should be dipped in “blue water” made with stone blue, said Constance Hall in the 17th century. In Elizabethan and Jacobean England, starch was sometimes mixed with other colours, to tint ruffs and collars according to fashion.